What wines I’ve had

Here’s a list of some red wines from 3 very different wine regions I have enjoyed lately…

Haywire Syrah 2012 – dry yet juicy with medium body and tannins, with red fruits, and a hint of the farmyard (don’t let that scare you, think hay, earth, and well…farmyard smells!). It had an essence of old world, yet grown in the ‘new world’. Visit the Winery in Summerland, BC or check out a Private or VQA Wine Store to buy.

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Anciano Tempranillo Gran Reserva 2006 –  What a deliciously smooth Tempranillo! Expect stewed ripe red fruits with a hint of vanilla. It’s medium body wine with soft medium tannins. And the price is under $15, available at BC Liquor Stores.

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Vista Del Rey Zinfandel 2012 – from the ‘other’ wine region of California…Paso Robles. This Zinfandel is exactly what you are NOT expecting! I tasted stewed red fruits, prunes, a bit of earthiness with a dose of high alcohol. If you don’t like Zinfandel because it’s too “fruity” , you need to try OTHER Zin’s, because they are not all the same. If you can’t make it to the winery in Paso, visit PasosBestWines to buy.

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What IS Prosecco?

It may be easy for some to pick a sparkling wine, but for the majority of us it can be a daunting task. Champagne, cremant, it’s not easy!

Will they taste the same? Which producer is better? Will it be sweet or dry? And what if you don’t like it! Well, there is that chance, but if you are already enjoying sparkling wines from elsewhere, then you are probably on the right track with Prosecco.

Let’s look at a few things to get to know Prosecco a little more:

IMG_33121. What

Prosecco is a sparkling white wine made from a local Italian grape called Glera, and it’s meant to be consumed young.

2. Where

It is made in the Veneto region of north-east Italy. So, put yourself in Venice – it’s a large area around there.

 

3. When

Historically, Italians would consume Prosecco in the spring, however, nowadays this is not followed 100% due to increased popularity and availability.

4. HowIMG_3232

It is made with the same steps as champagne is made. But of course, anything made outside of the champagne region of France is called something else. Every place outside of champagne can make their sparkling with different grapes, so don’t expect it always to be made from Chardonnay, Pinot Meunier or Pinot Noir. As for Prosecco, it is made from a local Italian grape called Glera. It goes through the same process as all sparklings, but its second fermentation is done in a stainless steel tank instead of in a bottle. This affects the overall style and makes it cheaper as it’s an easier process. Be sure to serve Prosecco in a tall sparkling glass as it does help bring the aromatics to up towards the nose and keeps the bubbles bubbly!

IMG_3264Now, let me share why I enjoy having Prosecco. Compared to a champagne, it’s light, refreshing – usually with citrus, mineral and green fruit notes. It dances on the palate with medium to low acidity and has low to medium body. Prices vary from cheap at $14 to high at $30, and yes there can be dry and off-dry (offering a bit of sweetness), however I would say most are dry. If you prefer dry you want to make sure it is: “nature brut”, “brut” or “extra brut”, these are the driest. I even added some St. Germain liqueur to a glass of simple Prosecco as it was a recommended cocktail – I was surprised that it worked!

Here are three Prosecco’s I’ve recently had and recommend:

1. Anna Spinato Prosecco Brut, Organic (in Vancouver, I paid $15)

2. Cecilia Beretta Brut, Congegliano Valdobbiadene, Prosecco Superiore (in the USA, I paid $10) – over all this way my favourite!

3. Adami Prosecco di Valdobbiadene Brut Bosco di Gica (in Vancouver, I paid $27)

 

I hope you enjoy discovering Prosecco’s – the Italian sparkling wine!

Cheers